Nursing Assistant

Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) must complete a state approved nursing assistant program and pass an exam to become certified. Nursing assistant programs are commonly offered at high schools, community colleges, technical schools, hospitals, and nursing homes. The average nursing assistant salary is $25,100 per year.
Certified Nursing Assistant

Practical Nurse

Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) must complete a state approved practical nursing program and pass an exam to become licensed. Practical nursing programs typically take one year to complete and are commonly found in community colleges, technical schools, and hospitals. The average practical nurse salary is $42,490 per year.
Licensed Practical Nurse

Registered Nurse

Registered Nurse (RN) must complete a state approved registered nursing program and pass a competency exam to become licensed. Registered nursing programs vary in duration from two to four years, and are part of an associate or bachelor degree program. The average registered nurse salary is $66,640 per year.
Registered Nurse

Nursing Schools, Degrees, And Programs

Getting into and paying for the best nursing school in America is not a realistic nursing career goal for most of us. But that's ok, and, now we can put that lofty dream aside and focus on the reality of the situation. There is a shortage of Registered Nurses according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and nursing schools across the country do not have the capacity to accept every student who applies.

According to the latest employment and average salary figures compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Registered Nurse is the second highest paying and one of the fastest growing occupations in America. Furthermore, if you group the Nursing Assistant, Practical Nurse / Vocational Nurse, and Registered Nurse occupations together using the BLS data you can comfortably set a career path which progresses through those three major nursing job titles.

Why can't hospitals and other healthcare providers just hire more workers and train them on the job? Nursing occupations are highly regulated and among the regulations is a minimum education requirement for nurses at various levels of care. To obtain a CNA, LPN, LVN, or RN nursing license, the candidate generally must:

  • Complete a state approved nursing degree or non-degree program.
  • Pass the license specific state nursing competency exam.
  • Apply for and pay the required state fees to obtain the nursing license.
  • Undergo a criminal background check which includes fingerprinting.
  • Take continuing education courses to maintain the nursing license.

A nurse working in the state of California, for example, must maintain a California nursing license issued by the California Department of Public Health, Licensing and Certification Division in order to legally perform his or her bedside duties. After completing a state approved diploma, certificate, associate, bachelor, or other nursing degree program, the nurse must apply for a nursing license. Once a license is granted the nurse can apply for a nursing job within the state.

Florida, Georgia, Illinois, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, just to name a few more examples, all require a nursing license or certificate. Given the level of standardization in the nursing profession, it's common for a Registered Nurse to start their career as a Nursing Assistant, later obtain a Practical Nursing or Vocational Nursing license, and enter a college or university nursing degree program to finally become a Registered Nurse. Along the way gaining valuable work experience, and saving money to pay for that ever increasing cost of college tuition.

Search Our Nursing Schools And Programs Database

Nursing schools of various sizes offer the degree and non-degree nursing programs required to meet or exceed the CNA, LPN, LVN, and RN license education requirements. While several nursing career paths can lead you to your ultimate goal of becoming a Registered Nurse, each path requires that you enroll into a nursing school.

California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and more states.

Our database of nursing schools is hand edited and reviewed on a rotating basis by our staff. The database contains over 2,000 technical schools, colleges, and universities located in the United States of America. You can browse our list of nursing schools by state and by city or perform a site search at the top of most web pages. ASN, BSN, MSN, LPN-to-RN, RN-to-BSN, RN-to-MSN are abbreviations commonly used on our website to identify a nursing programs duration, concentration, and major area of study.

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RN Registered Nursing

The RN is expected to handle more complex nursing situations and will often supervise LPN nurses …